Photographs: 40 M-M M2 Gun Carriage. Exhibit 3 (title from cover).
Photographs: 40 M-M M2 Gun Carriage. Exhibit 3 (title from cover).
Photographs: 40 M-M M2 Gun Carriage. Exhibit 3 (title from cover).
Photographs: 40 M-M M2 Gun Carriage. Exhibit 3 (title from cover).
Photographs: 40 M-M M2 Gun Carriage. Exhibit 3 (title from cover).

Photographs: 40 M-M M2 Gun Carriage. Exhibit 3 (title from cover).

Album of 63 linen-backed photographs by J.H. Schaefer & Son in Baltimore, Maryland, depicting scenes of wartime production needs being fulfilled mostly by women and African-American machinists, at the Bartlett Hayward munitions factory, specifically the production line for the M2 anti-aircraft gun including milling machines, preparation of the chassis, drilling, and assembly of the carriages, along with photographs of blueprints and commercial photographs of Koppers machine parts, possibly assembled for sales purposes. Each photograph with typed label to verso identifying date, location, and part and production details, along with photographer's stamp. Photographs 8" x 9-3/4", album oblong 8vo. Cloth boards, title stamped to cover, "1943" hand-written in black in on spine. Baltimore (Koppers Company/Barlett Hayward Division) n.d. (circa 1943).

The Bartlett-Hayward Company was started in 1840 as Hayward and Company and was founded by three stove manufacturers, including George Hayward. Not long after, Thomas Bartlett was added to the company and it was renamed Bartlett-Hayward. During the 19th and 20th centuries Bartlett-Hayward was a leading manufacturer nationwide, expanding into foundry, machinery, engineering, and architectural ironwork, among other fields. During World War I, regular production lines were shut down to make shrapnel shells for the war effort, a change in business that Barlett-Hayward approached with enthusiasm. After merging with the Pittsburgh-based Koppers Company in 1936, production again came to a halt during WWII and the firm became a main government supplier, producing the 40 MM M2 anti-aircraft gun carriage used by most of the Allies. By the end of the war, more than 2270 carriages had been produced in the factory. The industrial boom resulted in women and African-Americans being brought into the workforce in huge numbers, especially in Baltimore. As of September 2016, WorldCat does not show any listings for this album. Book ID: 48583

Price: $4,500.00