Most 81/82. Ji í Sozanský, Ji í Novák, Ji í Borl, Emil Juliš, Ivan Dolejšek, Ji í Putta, Petr Ková, Pavel Jasanský, Lubomir Jane ka, Václav Bláha.
Most 81/82.
Most 81/82.
Most 81/82.

Most 81/82.

35 pp. samizdat catalogue documenting a site-specific installation, an important unofficial art event in the early 1980's, organized by Sozanský and consisting of installations and environments by Sozanský, Ji í Novák, and Ji í Borl, which serve as reactions to the destruction of the historic center of the industrial town of Most to make room for mines, together with poems and photographs. Profusely illustrated throughout from photographs. 4to. Original stapled photo-illustrated wrpps. Prague (Jazzová sekce [Jazz Section]) n.d. (1982).

Samizdat refers to literature that was secretly written, copied, and circulated in the Soviet Union, usually critical of the Soviet government. Samizdat first began appearing after the death of Stalin in 1953, largely in protest against restrictions on the freedom of expression imposed on major Soviet authors. In the 60's, samizdat publications expanded their focus to include critiques of official Soviet policies and ideologies, including laws, economic policies, and treatment of religious and ethnic minorities. Due to the government's strict monopoly on presses and duplication devides, many samizdat publications took the form of carbon copies of handwritten sheets, which were then passed directly from reader to reader. This publication was semi-legally printed by the Jazz Section, an organization of jazz musicians that legally organized within the Czech Musicians' Union and thereby was allowed to publish bulletins for private use by its members. Very scarce; as of December 2018, WorldCat does not locate a single institutional holding in the United States. Book ID: 48991

Price: $650.00