Sun/Dance: White Panther Information Service. Vol. I, No. 1 (4 July 1970) through No. 3 (Feb-March 1971) (all published).
Sun/Dance: White Panther Information Service. Vol. I, No. 1 (4 July 1970) through No. 3 (Feb-March 1971) (all published).
Sun/Dance: White Panther Information Service. Vol. I, No. 1 (4 July 1970) through No. 3 (Feb-March 1971) (all published).

Sun/Dance: White Panther Information Service. Vol. I, No. 1 (4 July 1970) through No. 3 (Feb-March 1971) (all published).

A complete run in three issues of the short-lived counterculture journal from the far-left political collective, issues 32-40 pp., jointly edited by the Central Committee of the White Panther Party which included Ken Kelley and Gary Grimshaw, with topics covered including Woodstock Nation, the Black Panthers, political prisoners, sexism, Vietnam, Palestine, Harriet Tubman, drugs, rock and roll, hippie communes, Stonehead Manor, and food co-ops. Profusely illustrated throughout from cartoons, drawings, and photographs. Some light toning. Folio. Original illustrated newsprint wrpps. Some very minor marginal chipping, a few very minor tears. Ann Arbor (Sun/Dance, Central Committee, White Panther Party) 1970-1971.

Sun/Dance states in its premiere issue, "I am sure that the WHITE PANTHER PARTY and the YOUTH INTERNATIONAL PARTY, once well-organized, having correct strategy and clearsighted tactics, having respect for and close relations with the people, having good revolutionary methods, will become a tremendous strength that contributes to the successful struggle of all peoples against U.S. imperialism." The White Panthers were a far-left anti-racist white American political group founded in 1968 by John Sinclair, Leni Sinclair, and Pun Plamondon, in response to an interview in which Huey P. Newton, co-founder of the Black Panthers, was asked what white people could do to support them. The resulting group was most active in Detroit and in Ann Arbor, Michigan, where they dedicated their energy to "cultural revolution" and fought for issues such as a clean planet and the freeing of political prisoners. The White Panthers somewhat fell apart in 1972, following the conviction, imprisonment, and subsequent freeing of two of the group's three co-founders in landmark court decisions, including one which ruled warrantless wiretapping illegal. The group temporarily reunited under a new name, the Rainbow People's Party, before disbanding 1973. Scarce institutionally. Book ID: 49044

Price: $1,950.00