Alfavit Oktiabria: itogi vvedeniia novogo alfavita sredi narodov RSFSR [The alphabet of October: the results of introducing a new alphabet among the peoples of the RSFSR]. With a large folding chart showing the various special characters. N. Nurmakov, Tsentral nyi komitet novogo alfavita pri prezidiume VTSIK, Central Committee for a. New Alphabet of the Presidium VTsIK.
Alfavit Oktiabria: itogi vvedeniia novogo alfavita sredi narodov RSFSR [The alphabet of October: the results of introducing a new alphabet among the peoples of the RSFSR]. With a large folding chart showing the various special characters.

Alfavit Oktiabria: itogi vvedeniia novogo alfavita sredi narodov RSFSR [The alphabet of October: the results of introducing a new alphabet among the peoples of the RSFSR]. With a large folding chart showing the various special characters.

Moscow-Leningrad: Izdatel'stvo "Vlast' Sovetov" pri Prezidiume VTsIK, 1934. Octavo (22.2 × 14.6 cm). Original printed wrappers; 165, [1] pp. With errata sheet affixed to front cover. About very good; text toned due to stock.

Scarce volume published to assess the results of the transition from local scripts to the Soviet-mandated Unified Turkic Latin Alphabet throughout Central Asia and other regions using Turkic, Iranian, North Caucasian, Mongolian, Finno-Ugric,and other non-Slavic languages. The use of the Arabic alphabet in Central Asia, Caucasus, and the Volga Region (including Tatarstan) was abolished by the Soviet authorities after the October Revolution. The new alphabet for these languages was based on the Common Turkish Latin alphabet developed by Soviet linguists in the 1920s, also known as Yangalif (or yañalif), wich was gradually adopted for Bashkir, Kazakh, Kyrgyz, Karakalpak, Nenets languages, Even, Nanai language, Komi (the Latin Molodtsov alphabet), Kalmyk, Buriat, and other languages.

This anthology presents the results of these changes, as well as the reasoning behind the various new characters and special characters. The separate folding table consists of 64 alphabets created on the basis of the new Turkish Unified Latin Alphabet, with the final column featuring special letters contained in each alphabet. Books that had been printed in the old Arabic script (such as Yaña imlâ for Tatar) were later confiscated and withdrawn from libraries. In 1938-1940, official policy once again changed and Stalin's Russocentrism led to the introduction of the Cyrillic script in the affected regions. Curiously, in recent years many post-Soviet states, such as Kazakhstan, Uzbekistan, and Turkmenistan, have returned to a modified version of the Yangalif Latin script.

As of November 2019, KVK and OCLC only locate a single copy in North America at Yale (misdated to 1924); further copies at held by Bayerische Staatsbibliothek (a further copy at Berlin is marked a war loss).
Book ID: 50391

Price: $3,500.00